Health of Chinese career women: A green paper collaboration

Health of Chinese career women: A green paper collaboration

Blackmores Institute and Tsinghua University’s most recent collaboration has resulted in the publication of a Green Paper on the Health of Chinese Career Women this week.

Jointly published between the Tsinghua International Centre for Communications, a key research institution of the prestigious Tsinghua University, and Blackmores Institute, the pioneering study into Chinese career women’s health was released at the 13th China Health Communication Conference held by Tsinghua University and the National Health Committee in Beijing.
 
The study revealed that Chinese career women face a range of health challenges. Most of them believe their health status to be poor and rank sleeping problems as their top healthcare concern. In addition, psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and reclusiveness are becoming increasingly prevalent. Many women identified “office life” as one of their main sources of stress.
 
Dr Lesley Braun, Blackmores Institute Director said “Healthy women are critical for the health of the next generation, the health of families and the development of a healthy society. Our research also found that most career women are key decision makers and health guardians at home.”
 
The women included in the study cohort indicated a high demand for professional and reliable health information, however, they are increasingly relying on new media platforms for health information. Acknowledging that not all of this information is of the same quality and often contradictory, many Chinese career women indicated that they often feel confused, struggle to verify the validity of information, and that there is a strong demand for more professional health knowledge.
 
“Our study reveals that Chinese career women face a host of healthcare challenges, but with the right guidance and insight, they can be empowered to manage their health and pursue fuller lives. From workplace competition and fatigue to dieting and anxiety, Chinese career women juggle a range of issues in their day-to-day office lives. The most inspiring part of this study, however, is the finding that these women also already possess a keen intuition and insight into how to manage their health. In most cases, they simply need more credible information, expert advice, and guidance and support to achieve their health objectives,” the researchers stated.
 
Analysing data from two group discussion cohorts and survey responses from 1,016 career women, aged 22 to 55, from Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chengdu and Xi’an the Green Paper explores the careers, health status and health management habits of Chinese career women. 
 
Nielsen, a global leading research and data analytics firm, was commissioned to complete qualitative and quantitative research as part of this study. In addition, deep interviews with experts from government, academia, and the health industry were conducted to generate actionable and practical insights and solutions for the improvement of Chinese career women’s health.
 
The Tsinghua International Centre for Communications and Blackmores Institute have collaborated on a series of health communications and health literacy projects since 2017 in response to the Healthy China 2030 initiative. Throughout their work together, Tsinghua University and the Blackmores Institute have learned that the health of women and children is a critical cornerstone of China’s national public health more broadly.
 
“We are excited to continue working with the Tsinghua University’s International Center for Communications on a series of health communication projects to support the Chinese Government’s Healthy China 2030 vision, which acknowledges the importance of healthy lifestyles and prevention rather than treatment,” said Peter Osborne, Managing Director for Blackmores Asia.
 

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